Author - Brianna Langley

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From Ancestor Worship to Jesus Worship
2
‘If He Made Us to be a Nose, He Wants Us to Sniff’
3
How Do You Truly Immerse Yourself in a Culture?
4
Christmas: The Key to Ministering Inside Brothels
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‘We Don’t Want to be Heroes’: One Couple’s Church Planting Strategy
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What Do College Grads Have in Common with Retirees?
7
What Happens When You Tell God No?
8
A Shelf Full of Gods — and No Hope
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Third Culture Kids, Part 2: What it Means to Come Home
10
Third Culture Kids, Part 1: Overcoming Challenges On-Field

From Ancestor Worship to Jesus Worship

Missionaries try to reach people who are caught in ancestor worship like these people here.
Through your support, people like Dumisani are freed from the practices of ancestor worship. Now they're learning to study the Bible for themselves!

Dumisani was a good South African. He grew up believing everything his parents taught him — to go to church on Sundays, but then to worship the ancestors and put his faith in traditional healers the rest of the week. But when he started his freshman year of college, a group called the Zion Students Christian Organization caught his attention. Out of curiosity, Dumisani began attending some of their Bible studies. The more Dumisani learned about the Word, the more it challenged everything he thought he knew about salvation. And at one open-air church service on campus, Dumisani was faced…

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‘If He Made Us to be a Nose, He Wants Us to Sniff’

Bible Translation
God gives us special gifts for a reason. So how can He use someone with a love of languages?

Jaya was the daughter of a pastor. She went to a Christian high school. She’d grown up reading the Scriptures — and yet, she didn’t know what most Scripture meant. Because there were no clear Bible passages printed in Jaya’s mother tongue. So when she read the Scriptures, she only understood a fraction of what was written. Jaya needed Bible translators. Jaya needed Grace and Keith McCune. Made for Bible Translation Jaya’s predicament is one that tugs at the heartstrings of Grace and Keith. As TEAM missionaries in the Philippines, they help translate Scripture into heart languages throughout Asia. “The…

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How Do You Truly Immerse Yourself in a Culture?

Two local woman with a missionary
It's one thing to live in a culture, but how do you truly immerse yourself in one? It's a question as old as the Church.

Cultural immersion is a term that’s thrown around a lot in the world of missions. Missionaries are told they need to “integrate” — engage in the local daily life and try to understand the local people. Of course, this is easier said than done. How do you immerse yourself in a culture while also taking time to learn the language, find schooling for your kids and help your family adjust to life overseas? Fortunately, you’re not the first to face this dilemma. Here are some words of wisdom from those who have done it before: Learn the Language The importance…

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Christmas: The Key to Ministering Inside Brothels

Ministering Inside Brothels
Women across Europe will spend this Christmas season in brothels. But friends like you are giving them hope!

Angelika* is cold. Really cold. She tries to find a spot on the street near the big vans with curtains on the windows. Those clients are regulars, and with any luck, she’ll be able to warm up a bit in the vans when she does what she has to do with the men inside. She misses her home. She doesn’t even speak the language here. But her husband was abusive and then abandoned her and her two small children in this place. Now she is a single mother of two in a strange country — doing work she hates. This…

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‘We Don’t Want to be Heroes’: One Couple’s Church Planting Strategy

church planting strategy
What does it take to be a church planter? Find out as one TEAM missionary couple shares their church planting strategy!

“The word that sticks in my mind is walls,” TEAM missionary David North told his wife, Kathy when they scouted out the location of their last church plant. “There are cement walls everywhere, it’s industrial, it’s dirty, it’s gray, but there are also spiritual walls.” When David and Kathy moved to the Filipino city of Mandaue they could feel an overwhelming darkness. But still, they moved. David and Kathy North have been church planters for over 20 years and have successfully planted several churches. They are champions for growing the Kingdom. But it hasn’t always been an easy road. Several times…

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What Do College Grads Have in Common with Retirees?

short-term missionaries
Read how five individuals prove that anyone can become a short-term missionary — regardless of life stage. Photo courtesy of the David and Jan Fitzgerald.

A recent college graduate, a young married couple and a nearly retired couple wouldn’t typically have a lot in common. Gen Z-ers are just starting their careers and learning how to live as independent adults. Millennials are navigating buying houses, settling down and maybe even starting a new family. Baby Boomers are considering what life looks like after retirement and trying to decide how they will spend their post-career years. And yet, they do share one big thing: God is using them in short-term missions. A Couple with a House, Careers — and a Calling Going on a short-term mission…

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What Happens When You Tell God No?

called to ministry
Kwenzo had a mom and nine siblings to support. So when God called him to ministry, he thought it was impossible.

Kwenzo’s father was dead. His mother had eight other children to support. And as the oldest son, Kwenzo couldn’t just watch his family struggle. Ever since high school, he’d wanted to be an electrical engineer. It wasn’t just interesting. It could provide for his family! So when God called Kwenzo to a livelihood of ministry, he resisted. What about school? Kwenzo thought. How can I take care of my family on a minister’s salary? But then came the dreams. A Savior He Had to Follow Kwenzo was in high school when he met Jesus. A friend invited him to church,…

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A Shelf Full of Gods — and No Hope

Japanese Buddhist
She needed community. It was the doctor's orders, but for Machiko, all it took was a going a walk around the block to find what she so desperately needed. Read her story! Photo by TEAM

You need to join a club or social circle so you’ll have interaction with others on a regular basis, Machiko’s doctor said. You risk getting dementia if you don’t. When Machiko* went for her annual check-up, she already knew she struggled with depression. She knew she was socially withdrawn and battled an anxiety disorder called hikikomori. But she never thought her lack of a social life could cause her to lose her mind. She needed company — she needed friends. She needed help. It was overwhelming. When she got home, she decided to take a walk down the street to…

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Third Culture Kids, Part 2: What it Means to Come Home

third culture kid
Growing up as a third culture kid has its own challenges, but what's it like to come home to a place you've never called home? Find out as TCK's recount their personal experiences.

This is part two of a discussion on what it means to be a third culture kid. Check out part one here! I was 10 years old. I was in our apartment living room, sitting on our couch, surrounded by cardboard boxes. I felt sick to my stomach and scared to start over. I told my parents I wasn’t getting on the plane. I felt depressed because I knew I was just spewing nonsense. Of course I would have to get on the plane. I felt angry because my parents seemed so giddy and happy to be going home —…

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Third Culture Kids, Part 1: Overcoming Challenges On-Field

third culture kids
What is it like to grow up among multiple cultures? Read now to learn more about the challenges third culture kids experience on the mission field.

My 6-year-old self and my 4-year-old sister, Bianca stepped out of our front door, along with our mom, and into a dark, gray hallway. It smelled like rusted staircase railings and old wooden elevators. Sometimes the barely-big-enough-for-two-people elevator worked fine and sometimes it’d get jammed for a while. But we didn’t feel like walking down all the apartment stairs today, so we took our chances. The elevator creaked and rumbled, but made it to the bottom floor. “Taxi?” I asked Mom as we stepped out of the old, graffitied building and onto the city sidewalk. “The market is just around…

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