Category - Ministry Updates

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Facing Persecution, But She Has Peace
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How a Hospital Runs on 4 Hours of Water a Day
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International Churches: A Gateway to the Unreached
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Missionary Challenges: From Ready to Quit, to No Regrets
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Silent Night: A Guatemalan Christmas Story
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What God Can Do with 12 Books in the Wrong Language
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A Daughter’s Rebellious Prayer
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130 Years is a Long Time … Or Maybe Not!
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Clean Water for Today – and Tomorrow
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Keeping Kids from Drugs — through Basketball and Jesus

Facing Persecution, But She Has Peace

For Harriet, following Christ means struggling to feed her family and facing threats — but she wouldn’t trade Him for anything.
For Harriet, following Christ means struggling to feed her family and facing threats — but she wouldn’t trade Him for anything.

What does a new Christian do when she has to choose between following Jesus and earning a living? Harriet made her living as a religious teacher and healer in the town of Goz Beïda, Chad. Her beliefs were a blend of Islam and traditional folk religion. Three or four evil spirits would regularly come to Harriet, providing undisclosed details: This person has this illness. This person’s brother has cursed them. This person needs this specific treatment. Harriet would then provide a traditional herbal remedy or potion to solve her clients’ problems. And because she was well-versed in the Quran, she…

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How a Hospital Runs on 4 Hours of Water a Day

Two Karanda Mission Hospital doctors look at a patient's chart.
Karanda Mission Hospital is the only option most Zimbabweans have for surgery. But without dependable water, treatment becomes tricky.

Imagine if the State of Pennsylvania had one surgical hospital to serve the general public. Wealthy people would have their pick of facilities. But the middle and working class would come from all corners of the state  to get proper care. Now imagine that one hospital only had water for four hours a day. Thankfully, that isn’t reality for Pennsylvania. But it was for Zimbabwe, a country with 2 million more people than the state. And if Zimbabwe’s droughts continue, it could be the case again. Zimbabwe’s healthcare system consists of private and public hospitals and clinics, with public facilities…

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International Churches: A Gateway to the Unreached

Serving in international churches is a chance to minister to unreached people groups in closed nations - with the government’s blessing.

In a world where missionary visas are increasingly hard to get, Hunter and Wendy* are doing something truly remarkable. They’re moving to a Muslim-majority country where local churches operate underground. They’ll work to make disciples among unreached people groups. And they’ll do it with the local government’s approval. It sounds impossible, but opportunities like this are opening around the world, thanks to international churches. “It’s kind of amazing because it’s a Muslim country, and it’s illegal to become a Christian there, … but I’m going to have ‘pastor’ in my visa,” Hunter says. Committed to the Unreached Hunter and Wendy…

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Missionary Challenges: From Ready to Quit, to No Regrets

Annie Wilson smiling despite missionary challenges she faced
Annie took the missionary assignment of a lifetime in Chad. Then everything went sideways.

I don’t want to be a missionary anymore, Annie Wilson thought. She’d followed God’s leading and left her P.E. teaching and coaching job to serve Him overseas. So why did it feel like a dead end? Exploring Missions Annie began exploring missions in 2014 when she was asked a question: “What would you be willing to give up for God?” As Annie wrestled with her answer, she discovered TEAM and saw opportunities for sports ministry. TEAM connected her with a missions coach, Tasha Eckenhoff, who worked with her to find a role that would be a good fit. One option…

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Silent Night: A Guatemalan Christmas Story

The familiar story of Christ’s birth isn’t so familiar in Guatemala — even for those raised in church.
TEAM missionary Joe Dorris learned that the familiar story of Christ’s birth isn’t so familiar in Guatemala — even for those raised in church.

It was a cozy December night in 2017. Outside the apartment window, a resounding chorus of stray dogs and feral cats raised their voices in inharmonious unity. Inside, the cheerful sounds of laughter and hearty conversation combined with the warm smell of Guatemalan tamales and sweet ponche drink to bring about the cozy feeling that is known as Christmastime. “Ok everyone,” I announced. “To the living room. Study time.” The roughly ten guys rose sloth-like from the dinner table and migrated their full stomachs towards living room, where the sofa and chairs hungrily awaited, ready to swallow them whole. I…

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What God Can Do with 12 Books in the Wrong Language

Box of books
What do you do when your Bible study books arrive in the wrong language? You could send them back — or you could see how God planned to use them.

Heidi’s plan was simple: Teach her favorite Kay Arthur Bible study at church. Watch women grow in Christ. She ordered a dozen copies of the book in English, a common language in the Middle Eastern country where she served. But when the shipment arrived, something was horribly wrong. “There they were, 12 beautiful books, but … they were all in the Russian language!” Heidi says. Heidi’s co-worker said to send the books back. But Heidi realized God must have a plan. “OK, God, … You have brought these books in,” Heidi prayed, “and so we will keep them and give…

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A Daughter’s Rebellious Prayer

Imelda prays at TEAM church plant
When Imelda’s mom forbade her from going to church, Imelda rebelled. She got baptized — and prayed for her mother’s salvation.

“Are you crazy? What’s wrong with you?” Ten-year-old Imelda had just come home from an evening church service. She’d been growing to love and follow Jesus, and now she was ready to be baptized. But her mom, Vicenta, would have none of it. Their family was supposed to be Catholic, and Imelda’s involvement with a Protestant group raised all kinds of red flags for Vicenta. “She was a minor,” Vicenta says, suspicious that someone was manipulating her daughter. So when Imelda told her mom she wanted to be baptized, that was the deal breaker. Vicenta not only forbade the baptism,…

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130 Years is a Long Time … Or Maybe Not!

There seems to be an inverse relationship between advancing years and a birthday celebrant’s desire to see his or her birthday cake adorned with candles. At some point, the number of candles required to mark the corresponding years of life places the dessert’s quality in jeopardy.A handful of candles at a child’s birthday party is joyous. However, 130 candles on a cake celebrating TEAM’s founding in 1890 is another matter. It can make us feel old, beyond our prime, slipping into irrelevance and a host of other not so desirable emotions. However, in the history of the Kingdom of God,…

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Clean Water for Today – and Tomorrow

Water Well in Zimbabwe
With a well built to last at least 30 years, the Kanyemba village in Zimbabwe will be able to make long-term investments to grow their community.

Under a bright blue sky, in the dry shrubland of northern Zimbabwe, a small group gathered around a concrete platform and an odd-shaped contraption with two handles. It was a brand new well. The members of Kanyemba village took turns, two at a time, to crank the well, pulling the water up from its underground reservoir. The new handles were stiff at first, but the more they were used, the easier the job became. Children, women and men all stepped up and took their turn. Anyone who wanted to help was welcome. As everyone waited and watched for the first…

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Keeping Kids from Drugs — through Basketball and Jesus

Kids play basketball at sports ministry Transformados
Drugs are a big lure for kids in La Paz, Mexico — but a sports ministry is getting kids off the streets and teaching them the saving truth of Jesus!

“[If] my brother wouldn’t have invited me to Transformados, then I wouldn’t have known anything about God. … I would probably be on drugs, alcohol and sex,” Chuy says. Chuy’s alternate life isn’t hard to guess at because many of his friends are already living it. In the sprawling city of La Paz, Mexico, drugs are widely available. Some kids start using them as early as 13 years old. But in recent years, more and more children have found an alternative through a program called Transformados. Five days a week, they gather on a basketball court, eager to learn new…

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