Category - Missionary Life

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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Menudo
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When Raising MKs, Remember the ‘K’
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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Oyakodon
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Leaving a Legacy through Short-Term Missions
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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Aji de Gallina
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When It Comes to Missions, God Can Use Your Baby Steps
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What Do College Grads Have in Common with Retirees?
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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Mango Lassi
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Why Churches Should Visit Their Missionaries
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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Tres Leches Cake

TEAM Eats: Recipe for Menudo

Recipe for Menudo
Everyone in the Philippines has their own menudo recipe. Find out TEAM missionary Laura O'Day's favorite way to make it!

This is my husband’s favorite Filipino dish and a crowd-pleaser with our whole family. Filipinos often eat rice and ulam (which simply means “vegetables and maybe meat, in sauce, that goes on rice”) most for dinner. This is one of our regular ulam meals! Everybody here has their own menudo recipe, with their own blend of meat, vegetables, tomato sauce, bay leaves and spices. This particular recipe came from my friend, Leng. She’s a sweet person and an amazing chef! As a TEAM missionary in the Philippines, I wanted to learn some local recipes, so she graciously let me hover…

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When Raising MKs, Remember the ‘K’

raising missionary kids
When raising missionary kids, TEAM missionary Sue Querfeld suggests we not forget one very important detail. Keep reading to find out why!

I am not a huge fan of tattoos, but when my 21-year-old daughter showed me hers, I fell in love. It’s a simple design on her ankle — just the coordinates of Arequipa, Peru, where she grew up as a missionary kid (MK).  You might wonder, What’s the big deal about that? But as a missionary parent, the message to me is huge. It means my daughter so identifies with the place where she grew up that she wants to carry it with her forever. Lately, there has been an explosion of articles by or about MKs who rejected the…

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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Oyakodon

Japanese meal
Not only is oyakodon a family favorite, but it's also the first Japanese meal TEAM missionary Beth Anne Trim learned to make! Keep reading to get the recipe.

In Japanese, oyakodon literally translates to “parent and child on rice.” It is a popular dish in many restaurants here in Japan, and I first had it when I came as a short-term missionary to Japan in 2006. It was also the very first Japanese meal I learned how to make. (My daughter now asks for it all the time.) However, I like to add a unique twist by adding shiitake mushrooms because I think it adds a lot of flavor. Traditionally, this dish is made in a special oyako-nabe pan designed for donburi (“on rice”) dishes, making only one…

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Leaving a Legacy through Short-Term Missions

short-term missions legacy
What does it look like to leave a short-term missions legacy? One short-term missionary shares six lessons she learned from her experience.

I was reminiscing with my former missions leader when she said something unexpected: “The ministry area in South Asia still talks about your team as ‘the Dream Team.’” “The Dream Team?” Four years ago, a group of us had gone to serve in South Asia. We were there for four weeks to help a missionary couple, Isaac and Sandy, build houses for widows. “Yes,” my missions leaders said, “you guys had brought so much joy to them, which is why they still talk about you!” My missions leader’s words still echo in my heart. When we served in South Asia…

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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Aji de Gallina

Peruvian food recipe
If you're a fan of food that's both sweet and spicy, you'll want to try this missionary's Peruvian recipe for Aji de Gallina!

I first tried aji de gallina (hen’s chili) when we visited Peru for our vision trip in 2013. We then had this U.S. version with a Peruvian family from Oregon while we were raising support. This is an adaptation of the Peruvian meal due to the difficulty of finding aji amarillo, a medium-hot chili, in the States. (Pro tip: If you want the authentic taste, you can order jars of aji amarillo paste from Amazon or occasionally find it in a paste at a Latin foods store.) My favorite thing about aji de gallina has to be the spicy yet sweet taste,…

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When It Comes to Missions, God Can Use Your Baby Steps

missionary journey
Kiersten knew she was called to missions. But that meant facing her fears in order to get there. Read what God taught her throughout her missionary journey!

Kiersten Hutchinson was the perfect missionary candidate: She’d gone on short-term mission trips for years. She attended the Urbana missions conference, not once but twice. She led her church’s mission board and ran missions conferences. “If anyone asked about me, it was, ‘Oh yeah, she’s well on her way to missions,’” Kiersten says. “You know, no questions.” And that’s what Kiersten thought, too. Until it was actually time for her first two-year assignment. Suddenly, the confident 20-something was gripped with fear that wouldn’t budge. Two years in Zimbabwe was simply too much. And soon, she called her sending agency, TEAM,…

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What Do College Grads Have in Common with Retirees?

short-term missionaries
Read how five individuals prove that anyone can become a short-term missionary — regardless of life stage. Photo courtesy of the David and Jan Fitzgerald.

A recent college graduate, a young married couple and a nearly retired couple wouldn’t typically have a lot in common. Gen Z-ers are just starting their careers and learning how to live as independent adults. Millennials are navigating buying houses, settling down and maybe even starting a new family. Baby Boomers are considering what life looks like after retirement and trying to decide how they will spend their post-career years. And yet, they do share one big thing: God is using them in short-term missions. A Couple with a House, Careers — and a Calling Going on a short-term mission…

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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Mango Lassi

mango lassi recipe
Refreshing and nutritious? You can't go wrong with fresh lassi. Get a taste of India and discover TEAM's take on the mango lassi recipe! Photo by TEAM

The colder, the better! At least, that’s how I like my mango lassi drink. Originally from India and parts of Pakistan, the lassi is a common dessert drink where I grew up in Southeast Asia. After a hot and spicy meal, it’s not only refreshing, but it also has many nutritional benefits. Good mangos are harder to come by now that I live in East Tennessee. But thankfully, this recipe can be made with mango pulp out of a can from your local Asian market. Some say it’s even better than the mango chunks because your lassi will have a better…

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Why Churches Should Visit Their Missionaries

support long-term missionaries
Care packages and emails are a great encouragement to long-term missionaries. But what if the best way to support your missionary is giving them yourself? Photo courtesy of Beth Barthelemy

Last fall, my family had our first visitors since arriving on South African soil a year and some months ago. After months of anticipation, our pastor and friends from our Chicago church arrived to spend a week with us. They didn’t come as a short-term team, with a particular ministry focus. We had no projects lined up for them. They didn’t come to “check up” on us, to make sure we were worth their investment. They didn’t have a list of questions with which to assess our effectiveness or success. They came with a simple purpose: to be an encouragement…

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TEAM Eats: Recipe for Tres Leches Cake

cake recipe
For Nate Murphy, tres leches cake is more than just a cake — it's a fond memory of family and his years as a missionary kid in Venezuela. Keep reading to get the recipe! Photo by TEAM

Out of all the desserts in the world, cake ranks pretty low on my list, but tres leches isn’t just any cake. When my family moved to Venezuela as missionaries, I tried tres leches for the first time. I loved it so much, that my mom made it for my birthday every year — even after we moved back to the States. My mom would make tres leches for other special occasions as well. I still remember Cultural Awareness Day in middle school, where students brought food from other nations. I brought homemade tres leches. At first, students were hesitant…

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