Category - Missions Resources

1
Is Your Newsletter Mobile-Ready?
2
What Are You Giving Up for Lent?
3
Social Media for Missionaries (Part 3: FAQs)
4
Social Media for Missionaries (Part 2: Blogging)
5
Social Media for Missionaries (Part 1: Facebook)
6
13 Types of Missionary Newsletters We Should Stop Writing
7
Everyday Prayer
8
What You Should Know When Supporting Disaster Relief
9
Is Self-Funding for You?
10
Does Paying for Your Own Mission Trip Make It Better?

Is Your Newsletter Mobile-Ready?

One column or two? Resist the temptation to create your regular multi-column masterpiece, and go with one column instead.
One column or two? Resist the temptation to create your regular multi-column masterpiece, and go with one column instead.

Producing a regular ministry newsletter is a struggle and triumph few can fully appreciate if they haven’t endured it themselves. You rack your brain for ideas in a slow month, or make painful cuts in a full one. You spend hours finding the perfect words and pictures. Maybe you even try to emulate the design elements from another missionary’s newsletter. Finally, you stand back with pride and hit “send” — only to have your supporters open your newsletter on a smartphone, turning your hard-earned glory into a mess of tiny fonts on an oversized layout. The good news about living…

Read More

What Are You Giving Up for Lent?

Lent is the 40-day period leading up to Easter when Christians practice a sacrifice of some kind, and spend extra time in prayer and worship. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

What are you giving up for Lent? Did you hear this growing up? Not me. My childhood was spent in a non-liturgical church, so when I heard the word “lent,” I immediately thought about something coming off my clothes. I had no idea about a Christian calendar. But maybe you did grow up in a liturgical setting, and for you Lent invokes ideas of giving up something fun, like chocolate. I know a lot of people who give up coffee for Lent, but that’s just crazy-talk. As I’ve grown, I’ve come to appreciate the liturgical calendar as a way for…

Read More

Social Media for Missionaries (Part 3: FAQs)

There are multiple ways to use social media to connect with others, and we’re here to answer your most frequently asked questions. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

Welcome to our three-part series on how missionaries can use social media to connect with friends and supporters. Be sure to check out our first post where we shared tips on how to use Facebook for your ministry, and the second post in our series that focused on how to make the most out of your blog. We frequently receive the same questions from missionaries about Facebook, Twitter, blogging and more, and have compiled some general ideas and suggestions based on these conversations. We understand that there are countless resources for learning about and managing social media; our hope is to…

Read More

Social Media for Missionaries (Part 2: Blogging)

Your supporters want to know what is going on in your life and in your ministry, and blogging is the perfect way to keep them up-to-date. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

Welcome to our second installment of our three-part series on how missionaries can use social media to connect with friends and supporters. Be sure to check out our first post where we shared tips on how to use Facebook for your ministry! We frequently hear the same questions from missionaries about Facebook, Twitter, blogging and more, and have compiled some general ideas and suggestions based on these conversations. We understand that there are countless resources for learning about and managing social media; our hope is to simply invite you to discover new ways of using these tools to connect with…

Read More

Social Media for Missionaries (Part 1: Facebook)

Social media can be an excellent tool for engaging others in your ministry. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

Blogging, tweeting, posting and sharing are fabulous ways to share about your ministry, but navigating the world of social media and online communication can seem confusing and overwhelming. We’re here to tell you that it doesn’t have to be! Today, you’re reading the first installment of a three-part series on how missionaries can use social media to connect with friends and supporters. We frequently hear the same questions from missionaries about Facebook, Twitter, blogging, and more, and have compiled some general ideas and suggestions based on these conversations. We understand that there are countless resources for learning about and managing…

Read More

13 Types of Missionary Newsletters We Should Stop Writing

missionary newsletter how to
Make sure your missionary newsletter isn’t getting buried in your supporter's inbox.

This week, missions writer Amy Walters of SEND International shares tips on improving the venerable and ubiquitous missionary newsletter. I read a lot of missionary newsletters — about 100 every month. As part of my job, newsletters are some of my main sources of stories and information. I also serve on my church’s missions committee. So between the two, I’ve seen newsletters from all over the world and from a variety of missions organizations. Some of the newsletters I read are excellent. And some, well, not so much. Missionaries have incredible stories to share — they’re on the front lines…

Read More

Everyday Prayer

TEAM missionaries and local language experts work on translating the Bible for the Kwong tribe in Chad. Photo by Robert Johnson / TEAM

At the first of every month, we publish a monthly prayer focus, which delivers specific, up-to-date ways you can pray for TEAM missionaries on the field. Now, how many times do we say, “I’m praying for you” in response to an email or Facebook update from a missionary? When we’re honest, in the hustle and bustle of our days, we know it’s easier to say it than do it. Even during our regular prayer times, it’s hard to remember to pray for missionaries if we don’t have regular contact with them or can’t quite recall the specifics of their ministry….

Read More

What You Should Know When Supporting Disaster Relief

Japan disaster relief
Not all international ministries are equipped to respond to all disasters. TEAM responded to earthquakes and tsunami in Japan in 2011 (above), but chose not to make a formal fundraising appeal for typhoon relief in the Philippines. Photo by Robert Johnson / TEAM

Today, TEAM Chief Advancement Officer Arnie Adkison contributes to the blog. He addresses how you can make the most difference when tragedy strikes, and shares some of how TEAM decides when to get involved. Last week a retired TEAM missionary couple in southern Illinois had no idea that as they headed out to church, the home they would later return to was about to become rubble. While they prayed and worshiped with their church community, a tornado ripped through their town and destroyed their house and everything in it, leaving them with little more than the clothes they were wearing….

Read More

Is Self-Funding for You?

mission-trip-zimbabwe
Self-funding a mission trip is not for everyone. But some professions lend themselves especially well to paying your own way in short-term and even long-term missions. Photo by Timothy Yiu

This is the last of a three-part series exploring self-funding short-term missions. In this post, we explore whether you should consider self-funding your next mission trip. Read Part I and Part II of this series here. An estimated 2 million people or more in the United States take short-term mission trips each year. If you’re one of them, or even if you’re considering long-term missionary service, should you try to pay part or all of your own costs? Should you fundraise for the whole amount? “There’s really no best way to do it,” said John*, who uses seasonal work to…

Read More

Does Paying for Your Own Mission Trip Make It Better?

mission-trip-thailand
Chelsea Burdick used savings from freelance design work, among other jobs, to cover part of the cost of her recent trip with TEAM to Thailand. Photo courtesy Chelsea Burdick

This is the second of a three-part series exploring self-funding short-term missions. In this post, we explore the financial aspects of self-funding a mission trip. Read Part I of this series here. Or jump to Part III. John* began working summers as a firefighter on a tip from a friend. The gig got him through college. He kept it up after graduating, using his earnings to serve on repeated trips with TEAM as a short-term missionary in a creative-access country, at around $10,000 per trip. Now those summer wages are putting him through graduate school, and he has more mission…

Read More