Tag - Culture

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I Could Have Killed a Ministry Moment — Without Cross-Cultural Training
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Why I Need Other Cultures on My Church Planting Team
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How to Pray for Missionaries in Language School
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TEAM Eats: Salmorejo
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Reaching Out — When You Just Want to Stay Inside
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How COVID-19 Can Prepare You for Missions
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Minorities in Missions: When You’ve Never Fit in Anywhere
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Bitter Enemies Reunited in Christ
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May TEAM Eats: Recipe for Apple Torte
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April Team Eats: Recipe for Sadza

I Could Have Killed a Ministry Moment — Without Cross-Cultural Training

Muslim woman stands in French park, representing a situation in which cross-cultural training would be vital
When you minister to immigrants in a foreign country, cultural blunders are easy to make. You need the right cross-cultural training to give you a strong foundation for service.

Without cross-cultural training, it’s easy for a new missionary to make costly mistakes. Mine could have been losing a friendship over a bowl of couscous. When my husband and I sensed God calling us to serve overseas, we weren’t seminary educated. We had traveled to over 15 countries together, but that was just enough for us to know we weren’t equipped to sustain a successful career as missionaries. Then we heard about Launch, a two-year, intensive internship in southern France. While living amongst North African immigrants, interns are trained in three areas: How to be a living testimony in a…

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Why I Need Other Cultures on My Church Planting Team

Why I Need Other Cultures on My Church Planting Team
Every church planter has cultural blind spots. One of the best ways to find them is working with fellow believers from a variety of cultures.

I’m not sure if you know this, but you have a culture — and not all of it reflects God’s Kingdom values. Shocking, I know. This may not be an entirely new idea to you, but let me push it a bit further. Not all of the cultural convictions that you think reflect God’s Kingdom values actually reflect God’s Kingdom values. In other words, you and I have values we think are rooted in Gospel principles — but are actually, mostly, born from our cultures. There is some irony here for missionaries because many are great at spotting this in their…

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How to Pray for Missionaries in Language School

Annie Wilson talks with teenage girls in Spanish.
Language school can be physically, emotionally and spiritually exhausting. But TEAM missionaries like Annie Wilson (left) say it's all worth it.

If anyone is qualified to tell you how to pray for missionaries in language school, it’s Annie Wilson. After all, the TEAM missionary has gone to three kinds of language school in three countries: France, Chad and Mexico. Stepping into her first ministry assignment, Annie thought learning a new language would be a breeze. After all, if God called her to ministry, He should make it easy, right? “God definitely had to knock me down off my high horse and humble my heart within my first couple months of learning French,” Annie says now. Language school lays a critical foundation…

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TEAM Eats: Salmorejo

Salmorejo
Tomato soup isn’t just for cold fall days anymore! Cool off this summer with a cool and refreshing bowl of salmorejo, from Spain.

After a short-term mission trip to Spain, Lauren Witteveen decided she had to come back and continue the work. And with a tiny evangelical population in Spain, TEAM missionaries like Lauren have their work cut out for them! Lauren spends much of her time building relationships and studying Spanish, and the linguistic and cultural disconnects can be exhausting. So, on those long, hot Spanish days, Lauren likes to cool off with a nice bowl of salmorejo. This tomato soup dish has been a favorite since Lauren’s first visit to Spain. But even more than their food, Lauren loves the Spanish…

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Reaching Out — When You Just Want to Stay Inside

A missionary talks to a young child
Let's be honest, sometimes all a missionary wants to do is hide in their house or apartment. Here's how one missionary overcame the temptation.

Today’s blog post comes from a missionary working in Asia. For her safety, we have kept her name and location private. “Bloom where you’re planted.” As a worker in Asia for over 25 years, I have always had a love/hate relationship with this phrase!  I’m not super outgoing, so it’s difficult for me to reach out to others. Plus, building relationships takes a lot of time and energy. With our transient lifestyle, it’s easier for me to not bother. But I’m a missionary. Isn’t this the exact thing God has called me to do? God wants each of us, missionary…

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How COVID-19 Can Prepare You for Missions

Two men sit outside at a table and talk. Feature photo: Preparing for missions during COVID-19
COVID-19 has forced us to adapt and live our lives in ways we never have before — kind of like missionaries. Turns out, preparing for missions during COVID-19 has big advantages.

If you’re an aspiring missionary, COVID-19 may seem like a major roadblock to your plans. Short-term trips are being postponed. Carefully planned timelines for departure are now in shambles. And everyone keeps talking about how “the world will never be the same.” But Beth Fussner, a former missionary and TEAM’s learning and development project director, sees things with a bit more optimism. “There’s so many times when God’s people were on delays and detours. … And all of those things, when you look at the Scripture, at the stories, you realize that God either caused them or used them,” Fussner…

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Minorities in Missions: When You’ve Never Fit in Anywhere

A TEAM missionary laughs with her neighbors
Serving as a minority comes with a unique perspective and set of challenges. Missionaries share their experiences and their tips for how to keep going.

¡Lea esta publicación en español aquí! Recently, I was at a missions conference where I joined a seminar on Latina women in leadership. One of the participants, a first-generation American with Hispanic background made a comment that struck me. She said, “I feel called to go serve in Japan, but if I don’t fit in here in America where I was born because I’m a minority, how much harder will it be to fit in, in a different country?” As a missions coach, I have a list of different reasons why people choose not to go overseas: fear of the…

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Bitter Enemies Reunited in Christ

Julio and Libia sit together and study the Bible.
You would never guess that Julio and LIbia were once bitter enemies. Keep reading to see the amazing way God worked in their lives!

On Sunday mornings, Libia and Julio don’t look like anything special. Just two close friends worshiping God, maybe imagining their future together. You would never guess that this time last year, they wouldn’t speak to each other — much less be in the same room together. Or that they were bitter enemies for five long years. The fact that they happily sit together at church now? TEAM missionary Dawn Moore says it’s nothing short of a miracle.   Peruvian Couple Seeks Better Life in States Libia and Julio’s relationship was complicated from the beginning.  They both grew up in Peru as…

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May TEAM Eats: Recipe for Apple Torte

People in Austria enjoy many different desserts and one of them is the pictured apple torte, which resembles an American cheese cake.
A common dessert in Austria is this delicious apple torte. Check out the recipe below and try it out for yourself!

Today’s TEAM Eats comes from Melissa Lundquist, a TEAM worker in Austria. I recently met a colleague at an Austrian café. We usually meet in the afternoons, during the traditional kaffee und kuchen (afternoon coffee and cake) time. There are so many coffeehouses in Vienna to choose from! We’ve been to traditional ones and we’ve been to modern ones, both of which have pros and cons — but the idea of afternoon coffee and cake is the same regardless. When you walk into a coffeehouse in Austria, you’re greeted by a glass display case of cakes and desserts. After you…

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April Team Eats: Recipe for Sadza

Learn how to cook maize like a Zimbabwean with this recipe for Sadza and Peanut Butter Greens!

Maize is the staple food for most tribes in Zimbabwe. People often make a maize dish called sadza, where they cook cornmeal like a thick cream of wheat and serve it with cooked greens. The sadza is mounded high and people generally pinch off some, make a small ball, indent it with their thumb and use it to scoop up veggies. My husband, Jon, and I especially enjoy peanut butter cooked greens. Check out how to make sadza and peanut butter greens for yourself!   Ingredients for Sadza: 1¼ cups white cornmeal/corn flour Water Ingredients for Peanut Butter Greens 1…

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