Tag - Culture

1
TEAM Eats: Recipe for Oyakodon
2
TEAM Eats: Recipe for Aji de Gallina
3
TEAM Eats: Recipe for Mango Lassi
4
A Shelf Full of Gods — and No Hope
5
TEAM Eats: Recipe for Tres Leches Cake
6
Why Does God Use Missionaries?
7
Third Culture Kids, Part 2: What it Means to Come Home
8
How to Handle Culture Stress
9
7 Facts You Should Know About Taiwan
10
5 Reasons to Be a Missionary in Lesser-Known Lesotho

TEAM Eats: Recipe for Oyakodon

Japanese meal
Not only is oyakodon a family favorite, but it's also the first Japanese meal TEAM missionary Beth Anne Trim learned to make! Keep reading to get the recipe.

In Japanese, oyakodon literally translates to “parent and child on rice.” It is a popular dish in many restaurants here in Japan, and I first had it when I came as a short-term missionary to Japan in 2006. It was also the very first Japanese meal I learned how to make. (My daughter now asks for it all the time.) However, I like to add a unique twist by adding shiitake mushrooms because I think it adds a lot of flavor. Traditionally, this dish is made in a special oyako-nabe pan designed for donburi (“on rice”) dishes, making only one…

Read More

TEAM Eats: Recipe for Aji de Gallina

Peruvian food recipe
If you're a fan of food that's both sweet and spicy, you'll want to try this missionary's Peruvian recipe for Aji de Gallina!

I first tried aji de gallina (hen’s chili) when we visited Peru for our vision trip in 2013. We then had this U.S. version with a Peruvian family from Oregon while we were raising support. This is an adaptation of the Peruvian meal due to the difficulty of finding aji amarillo, a medium-hot chili, in the States. (Pro tip: If you want the authentic taste, you can order jars of aji amarillo paste from Amazon or occasionally find it in a paste at a Latin foods store.) My favorite thing about aji de gallina has to be the spicy yet sweet taste,…

Read More

TEAM Eats: Recipe for Mango Lassi

mango lassi recipe
Refreshing and nutritious? You can't go wrong with fresh lassi. Get a taste of India and discover TEAM's take on the mango lassi recipe! Photo by TEAM

The colder, the better! At least, that’s how I like my mango lassi drink. Originally from India and parts of Pakistan, the lassi is a common dessert drink where I grew up in Southeast Asia. After a hot and spicy meal, it’s not only refreshing, but it also has many nutritional benefits. Good mangos are harder to come by now that I live in East Tennessee. But thankfully, this recipe can be made with mango pulp out of a can from your local Asian market. Some say it’s even better than the mango chunks because your lassi will have a better…

Read More

A Shelf Full of Gods — and No Hope

Japanese Buddhist
She needed community. It was the doctor's orders, but for Machiko, all it took was a going a walk around the block to find what she so desperately needed. Read her story! Photo by TEAM

You need to join a club or social circle so you’ll have interaction with others on a regular basis, Machiko’s doctor said. You risk getting dementia if you don’t. When Machiko* went for her annual check-up, she already knew she struggled with depression. She knew she was socially withdrawn and battled an anxiety disorder called hikikomori. But she never thought her lack of a social life could cause her to lose her mind. She needed company — she needed friends. She needed help. It was overwhelming. When she got home, she decided to take a walk down the street to…

Read More

TEAM Eats: Recipe for Tres Leches Cake

cake recipe
For Nate Murphy, tres leches cake is more than just a cake — it's a fond memory of family and his years as a missionary kid in Venezuela. Keep reading to get the recipe! Photo by TEAM

Out of all the desserts in the world, cake ranks pretty low on my list, but tres leches isn’t just any cake. When my family moved to Venezuela as missionaries, I tried tres leches for the first time. I loved it so much, that my mom made it for my birthday every year — even after we moved back to the States. My mom would make tres leches for other special occasions as well. I still remember Cultural Awareness Day in middle school, where students brought food from other nations. I brought homemade tres leches. At first, students were hesitant…

Read More

Why Does God Use Missionaries?

global missionaries
Missionaries face so many cultural barriers, have you ever wondered why God even bothers with them? See what one missionary learned during her search for answers. Photo by TEAM

My co-worker and I had everything set to start our mom’s club. The moms were eager, and we’d found a popular American Christian parenting book that’s available in both Chinese and English. But as the weeks went on, I noticed something strange. We enjoyed good fellowship with the moms, but they all seemed to avoid talking about the content of the book — the very thing I’d hoped would lead to deeper spiritual conversation.   Finally, I got more pointed with my questions: “In this part, he’s talking about how important it is to cultivate an internal system of self-control…

Read More

Third Culture Kids, Part 2: What it Means to Come Home

third culture kid
Growing up as a third culture kid has its own challenges, but what's it like to come home to a place you've never called home? Find out as TCK's recount their personal experiences.

This is part two of a discussion on what it means to be a third culture kid. Check out part one here! I was 10 years old. I was in our apartment living room, sitting on our couch, surrounded by cardboard boxes. I felt sick to my stomach and scared to start over. I told my parents I wasn’t getting on the plane. I felt depressed because I knew I was just spewing nonsense. Of course I would have to get on the plane. I felt angry because my parents seemed so giddy and happy to be going home —…

Read More

How to Handle Culture Stress

culture stress
Feeling tired, drained or frustrated while living overseas? You might be experiencing culture stress. Here's how to handle it and adapt to your new normal. Graphics by TEAM

In the last 18 years, I have traveled to countries on nearly every continent. Every country I traveled to has taught me about culture and about myself. Through my travels, I have experienced things completely foreign to my definition of normal. I  have bathed and washed my hair in a bucket, slept in a treehouse, eaten with monkeys, been roommates with scorpions, used two boards as a toilet, traveled through the mountains in the back of a pickup truck and eaten foods I can’t pronounce. All of these experiences, while exciting, triggered culture stress in me, which can affect your…

Read More

7 Facts You Should Know About Taiwan

Facts about taiwan
Taiwan's culture is a captivating tapestry of old and new traditions. Here are seven facts about Taiwan you should know before you see it for yourself. Photos by TEAM

When the Portuguese landed in Taiwan, they called it “Formosa,” meaning “beautiful island.” And appropriately so. Taiwan teems with natural wonders like cascading rivers, hot springs and the highest mountains in Northeast Asia. Today, this natural beauty is the backdrop for some of the world’s most technologically advanced cities. Here are seven facts about Taiwan you should know before you see this tapestry of ancient and new for yourself. 1. It’s the size of Belgium with the population of Australia.   Taiwan is one of the most densely populated countries on the planet. It is only slightly bigger than Belgium and home to…

Read More

5 Reasons to Be a Missionary in Lesser-Known Lesotho

missionary in lesotho
Lesotho doesn't make international headlines very often, but this lesser-known nation is in need of Christian workers to go and share the gospel.

When we consider overseas missions, we are often captivated by impact. We consider locations, gifts and desires to “maximize” kingdom effectiveness. Many of us look at cities like London, Tokyo or Dubai where we pray that the ripple effect of our efforts will carry on for generations. The longing is God-given, and if the Lord leads us there, we should joyfully accept the privilege. But it’s good to remember Jesus isn’t confined to big cities and major outposts of industry and commerce. He cares about the less dense populations, the marginalized and the forgotten but equally wanted. He cares about…

Read More