Tag - medical missions

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When Medical Workers Go to the Ends of the Earth [December Prayer Focus]
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Prosthetics Lead to First Steps of Faith
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In Pakistan, Being a Doctor is More Than Medicine
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Photo Journal: Zimbabwe
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Finding My Place

When Medical Workers Go to the Ends of the Earth [December Prayer Focus]

medical workers
Sharing the Gospel through medical missions often sends workers into the most remote, and often most diseased, parts of the world in the name of Jesus. Will you join us in praying for these missionaries? Photo by TEAM

There’s an old saying that “people don’t care what you know until they know that you care.” If anyone understands that, it’s Jesus. During His ministry on Earth, He often healed people’s physical ailments before tending to their spiritual needs. Being the hands and feet of Christ means that we are called to bring hope and healing. For this reason, medical missionaries go into the most remote, and often most diseased, parts of the globe. This December, will you pray with us for medicine and healthcare ministries around the world? Click here to get a printable version of these requests,…

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Prosthetics Lead to First Steps of Faith

prosthetic ministry
In a country where Christians are persecuted, a Christian couple is using a prosthetic clinic to tangibly point the community to the wholeness we have in Christ. Photo by TEAM

For as long as Cho* can remember, her Asian country has been a nation of landmines. Farmers trigger them while reclaiming fields, women while going to town, children while coming home from school. After decades of ongoing war, rural areas, especially, are teeming with the passive weapons. And the resulting explosions have made missing limbs almost common. When Cho was born missing an arm and both legs, she should have been able to get prosthetics. But like many people in the country, her parents were — and are — still suffering the economic toll of war. They couldn’t afford prosthetics….

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In Pakistan, Being a Doctor is More Than Medicine

bach christian hospital
People in northern Pakistan have been known to travel for hours to be seen by doctors at Bach Christian Hospital. And it's not because Bach is the only hospital around. Photo by TEAM

Most mornings, Dr. Luke Cutherell’s alarm rings at 4:30 a.m. — that is, if he wasn’t already awake operating all night. After a quick run, Cutherell studies his Bible over breakfast, and by 7:00 a.m., he’s at Bach Christian Hospital in northern Pakistan, making rounds with inpatients. An hour later, he gathers with a multinational staff of 225 nurses, physicians and surgeons to pray for the healing work ahead. Then he’s off to the clinic, where 300 to 400 people are eagerly waiting to receive treatment for everything from kidney stones to cancer. These patients have traveled distances ranging from…

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Photo Journal: Zimbabwe

Two months ago, Kameron and Erin Toews boarded a plane in South Dakota and landed in Zimbabwe to serve at Karanda Missions Hospital. Check out their photo journal below as they give us a day-in-the-life glimpse of ministry and culture in southern Africa.

Makadii. Hello internet! We’re the Toews from South Dakota, USA, living at Karanda Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe for a year. Erin is serving as a nurse, and Kam is working as a videographer. We’ve been here two months now, and we’re are slowly getting into the swing of things. It’s amazing to be a part of God’s life changing work in beautiful Zim. We’re pumped to give you a small taste of life in the bush. So let’s go – hundai!

Makadii. Hello, Internet! We’re the Toews from South Dakota, USA, living at Karanda Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe for a year. Erin is serving as a nurse, and Kam is working as a videographer. We’ve been here two months now, and we are slowly getting into the swing of things. It’s amazing to be a part of God’s life-changing work in beautiful Zim. We’re pumped to give you a small taste of life in the bush. So let’s go – hundai!

 

Home sweet home! Here’s a typical Zimbabwean family home, with each building acting as a sort of “room” in the family’s house.

Home sweet home! Here’s a typical Zimbabwean family home, with each building acting as a sort of “room” in the family’s house.

 

Let us introduce you to sadza, the staple of the Zimbabwe diet. Sadza is corn meal mixed with water until it becomes the consistency of very thick mashed potatoes. Here it is served with a relish in peanut butter sauce, and seasoned chicken. I’m sure you were wondering: yes, of course you eat with your hands.

Let us introduce you to sadza, the staple of the Zimbabwe diet. Sadza is corn meal mixed with water until it becomes the consistency of very thick mashed potatoes. Here it is served with seasoned chicken and a relish in peanut butter sauce. I’m sure you were wondering: yes, of course you eat with your hands.

 

We’re serving at Karanda Mission Hospital this year, and almost every day we hear a local tell us how KMH is the best hospital in Zimbabwe. People travel across the entire country simply to receive quality, loving care. May God continue to be honored and made famous because of this hospital in the middle of the bush!

We’re serving at Karanda Mission Hospital this year, and almost every day we hear a local tell us how KMH is the best hospital in Zimbabwe. People travel across the entire country simply to receive quality, loving care. May God continue to be honored and made famous because of this hospital in the middle of the bush!

 

Nursing in Zimbabwe is so so so different than what I’m used to in America. Sure the culture and language is different, but even the names of medicines and basic procedures are different. I’m on the pediatrics ward this week, and I’m loving that I get to help the little munchkins. But some days can be frustrating and overwhelming since I have to re-learn so many nursing skills.

Nursing in Zimbabwe is so, so, so different from what I’m used to in America. Sure, the culture and language are different, but even the names of medicines and basic procedures are different. I’m on the pediatrics ward this week, and I’m loving that I get to help the little munchkins. But some days can be frustrating and overwhelming since I have to re-learn so many nursing skills.

 

“Mommy, this man took my picture with a big machine.” A smile is a beautiful thing.

“Mommy, this man took my picture with a big machine.” A smile is a beautiful thing.

 

Kids are something else! Even across the world in a culture so different than mine, kids are the same. You have the trouble makers, the pouters, the popular kids, the shy ones, and everything in between. Awana has been a great place for us to meet local kids and hear them shout Bible verses at the top of their little lungs.

Kids are something else! Even across the world, in a culture so different from mine, kids are the same. You have the trouble-makers, the pouters, the popular kids, the shy ones, and everything in between. Awana has been a great place for us to meet local kids and hear them shout Bible verses at the top of their little lungs.

 

Just a few years ago when Zimbabwe’s economy was at its lowest, $500,000,000 might be able to buy you a loaf of bread. Now, Zimbabwe has officially changed to the US Dollar, and the old notes are simply worth their value in paper. Today, we’re using US bills, and many of them are holding together by a thread.

Just a few years ago, when Zimbabwe’s economy was at its lowest, $500,000,000 might have been able to buy you a loaf of bread. Now, Zimbabwe has officially changed to the US Dollar, and the old notes are simply worth their value in paper. Today, we’re using US bills, and many of them are holding together by a thread.

 

Meet Douglas. Douglas walks the 7k path from his village to our house three days a week to tend our plants and yard for just a few hours of work a day. It can be difficult to find paying work in Zimbabwe, even for skilled and willing workers. He is such a joyous man and a hard worker. Many days Douglas has worked longer than asked because he can’t leave a job unfinished! When the economy gets better he plans to return to school to get a university degree in agriculture or teaching.

Meet Joshua. Joshua walks the 7k path from his village to our house three days a week to tend our plants and yard for just a few hours of work a day. It can be difficult to find paying work in Zimbabwe, even for skilled and willing workers. He is such a joyous man and a hard worker. Many days, Joshua has worked longer than asked because he can’t leave a job unfinished! When the economy gets better, he plans to return to school to get a university degree in agriculture or teaching.

 

Karanda Mission Hospital has an in-house radio studio that broadcasts music, devotionals, local news, and Bible readings to the wards. Each Friday morning, the nursing students fill the studio to sing and pray over the patients.

Karanda Mission Hospital has an in-house radio studio that broadcasts music, devotionals, local news and Bible readings to the wards. Each Friday morning, the nursing students fill the studio to sing and pray over the patients.

 

It’s jacaranda season! The purple trees remind us of a Dr. Seuss book. At the end of the day, the hospital court yard clears out only until the next morning where it’s again buzzing with patients, family members, and staff.

It’s jacaranda season! The purple trees remind us of a Dr. Seuss book. This tree sits in the hospital court yard, which buzzes daily with patients, family members and staff.

 

I see you through my binoculars. Meet Gary and Janet and their baby. Zimbabwe is known worldwide for its safaris and game parks. There’s no animal quite as amazing (aka awkward) as the giraffe. It’s our favorite and decorates much of our house.

I see you through my binoculars. Meet Gary and Janet and their baby. Zimbabwe is known worldwide for its safaris and game parks. There’s no animal quite as amazing (AKA awkward) as the giraffe. It’s our favorite and decorates much of our house.

 

Something as simple as driving needs to be relearned in Zimbabwe. Why? 1) 99% of vehicle are stick shift and we had never driven a manual before. 2) Drive on the left side of the road. 3) Traffic lights – aka “robots” - may or may not be working today. 4) DEFENSIVE DRIVING. People, cows, and public transit vans pop out of absolutely every crevice along the road.

Something as simple as driving needs to be relearned in Zimbabwe. Why? 1) 99% of vehicle are stick shift, and we had never driven a manual before. 2) Drive on the left side of the road. 3) Traffic lights – AKA “robots” – may or may not be working today. 4) DEFENSIVE DRIVING. People, cows and public transit vans pop out of absolutely every crevice along the road.

 

“Do not withhold good from those who deserve it, when it is in your power to act. Do not say to your neighbor, ‘Come back later; I’ll give it tomorrow’ – when you now have it with you.” Proverbs 3:27 & 28. This verse has become something of a theme verse for our little family. We do not always live by it, but regret it every time we forget its importance.

“Do not withhold good from those who deserve it, when it is in your power to act. Do not say to your neighbor, ‘Come back later; I’ll give it tomorrow’ – when you now have it with you” Proverbs 3:27-28. This verse has become something of a theme verse for our little family. We do not always live by it, but we regret it every time we forget its importance.

 

Want to connect with the Toews? Follow Kameron and Erin on Instagram or check out their blog.

PRAY

Pray that Erin will have confidence, patience and humbleness as she goes through orientation in a hospital setting very different than what she’s used to in America.

Pray that Kameron will have an eye to see stories that need to be told around Karanda.

Pray that God will teach the Toews to find their worth in Christ, not in completing a to-do list, and that they will find some good local friendships.

Praise God for the wonderful missionary relationships they’ve been able to build already.

GIVE

You can give directly to the Toews’s ministry in Zimbabwe by clicking here.

You can help TEAM send more missionaries like Kameron and Erin by supporting the Global Outreach (GO) Fund. Click here to give!

SERVE

Right now there are 47 different opportunities for you to serve in Zimbabwe. Missionaries are needed in the areas of education, medical care and business. Click here to learn more about TEAM’s ministries in Zimbabwe and view service opportunities.

Finding My Place

Some missionaries aren’t evangelists or great teachers, but every person is needed to play a role in building Christ’s kingdom. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

We asked Dr. Doug Lindberg to share about the need for people with different gifts and talents in the mission field. This opinion column appears in the fall 2014 issue of Horizons magazine, which hits mailboxes starting this week. Mission hospitals breed chaos. Physical needs and illness are constant and often dramatic. In a single day at our hospital in Nepal, I could see multiple patients from a car accident, do a C-section, do rounds on 25 inpatients, discipline a staff member, treat a bear bite in the ER, orient a new foreign volunteer, diagnose and treat typhoid fever, and find a half-eaten…

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