Tag - personal narrative

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Experiencing Miscarriage as an Expat Missionary
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I Could Have Killed a Ministry Moment — Without Cross-Cultural Training
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Missionary Challenges: From Ready to Quit, to No Regrets
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Reaching Out — When You Just Want to Stay Inside
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3 Keys to Muslim Ministry — and Their Pitfalls
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What Can Mount Kilimanjaro Teach You About God?
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When Raising MKs, Remember the ‘K’
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Leaving a Legacy through Short-Term Missions
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Third Culture Kids, Part 2: What it Means to Come Home
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Third Culture Kids, Part 1: Overcoming Challenges On-Field

Experiencing Miscarriage as an Expat Missionary

My expectations came crashing down when our sacred space was violated and took on an unexpected tone of trauma, grief and shame.

I sat on the frigid, white-tiled bathroom floor, cradled in my husband’s arms as I wept and bled. We had arrived early at this remote hilltop resort to set up a few things up for our annual conference. Moments before we were expected to go out and greet everyone, I lost the baby we were expecting. I walked out of the bathroom into the cold, heatless room and stared at the white sheets on the hotel bed. I wanted to be anywhere but at the hotel, surrounded by people. Having just finished our year and a half language program, we…

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I Could Have Killed a Ministry Moment — Without Cross-Cultural Training

Muslim woman stands in French park, representing a situation in which cross-cultural training would be vital
When you minister to immigrants in a foreign country, cultural blunders are easy to make. You need the right cross-cultural training to give you a strong foundation for service.

Without cross-cultural training, it’s easy for a new missionary to make costly mistakes. Mine could have been losing a friendship over a bowl of couscous. When my husband and I sensed God calling us to serve overseas, we weren’t seminary educated. We had traveled to over 15 countries together, but that was just enough for us to know we weren’t equipped to sustain a successful career as missionaries. Then we heard about Launch, a two-year, intensive internship in southern France. While living amongst North African immigrants, interns are trained in three areas: How to be a living testimony in a…

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Missionary Challenges: From Ready to Quit, to No Regrets

Annie Wilson smiling despite missionary challenges she faced
Annie took the missionary assignment of a lifetime in Chad. Then everything went sideways.

I don’t want to be a missionary anymore, Annie Wilson thought. She’d followed God’s leading and left her P.E. teaching and coaching job to serve Him overseas. So why did it feel like a dead end? Exploring Missions Annie began exploring missions in 2014 when she was asked a question: “What would you be willing to give up for God?” As Annie wrestled with her answer, she discovered TEAM and saw opportunities for sports ministry. TEAM connected her with a missions coach, Tasha Eckenhoff, who worked with her to find a role that would be a good fit. One option…

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Reaching Out — When You Just Want to Stay Inside

A missionary talks to a young child
Let's be honest, sometimes all a missionary wants to do is hide in their house or apartment. Here's how one missionary overcame the temptation.

Today’s blog post comes from a missionary working in Asia. For her safety, we have kept her name and location private. “Bloom where you’re planted.” As a worker in Asia for over 25 years, I have always had a love/hate relationship with this phrase!  I’m not super outgoing, so it’s difficult for me to reach out to others. Plus, building relationships takes a lot of time and energy. With our transient lifestyle, it’s easier for me to not bother. But I’m a missionary. Isn’t this the exact thing God has called me to do? God wants each of us, missionary…

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3 Keys to Muslim Ministry — and Their Pitfalls

Mosque
God is opening new doors to reach Muslims. Find out how you can engage with them — and what traps to avoid as you share the Gospel.

Today’s blog post comes from a missionary working in the Middle East. For his safety, we have kept his name and location private. In 1987, my wife and I got a call asking if we would like to help new university students coming from the Middle East. We were excited for the opportunity as we were already preparing to work among Muslims in Central Asia. Before long, we were inviting Muslim students to our home, taking them out to shop, and helping them adjust to life in the U.S. One day, while at a large grocery store, we passed in…

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What Can Mount Kilimanjaro Teach You About God?

Brett Miller's climb up Mount Kilimanjaro was just supposed to be a fun adventure. Instead, he came away with enduring lessons about his faith. Photo courtesy of Brett Miller.

As a missionary to Swaziland, my job feels like a vacation, so I don’t often take one. But this year, friends and family gave a generous gift with strict instructions that the money was to be used on something I wanted to do — but not on anything ministry related. Some friends and I decided that, despite my being 54, we should climb to the highest peak in Africa. When we arrived at the base of Kilimanjaro, the guides told us there are four rules to follow to summit the mountain. He told us we must: Have a good attitude….

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When Raising MKs, Remember the ‘K’

raising missionary kids
When raising missionary kids, TEAM missionary Sue Querfeld suggests we not forget one very important detail. Keep reading to find out why!

I am not a huge fan of tattoos, but when my 21-year-old daughter showed me hers, I fell in love. It’s a simple design on her ankle — just the coordinates of Arequipa, Peru, where she grew up as a missionary kid (MK).  You might wonder, What’s the big deal about that? But as a missionary parent, the message to me is huge. It means my daughter so identifies with the place where she grew up that she wants to carry it with her forever. Lately, there has been an explosion of articles by or about MKs who rejected the…

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Leaving a Legacy through Short-Term Missions

short-term missions legacy
What does it look like to leave a short-term missions legacy? One short-term missionary shares six lessons she learned from her experience.

I was reminiscing with my former missions leader when she said something unexpected: “The ministry area in South Asia still talks about your team as ‘the Dream Team.’” “The Dream Team?” Four years ago, a group of us had gone to serve in South Asia. We were there for four weeks to help a missionary couple, Isaac and Sandy, build houses for widows. “Yes,” my missions leaders said, “you guys had brought so much joy to them, which is why they still talk about you!” My missions leader’s words still echo in my heart. When we served in South Asia…

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Third Culture Kids, Part 2: What it Means to Come Home

third culture kid
Growing up as a third culture kid has its own challenges, but what's it like to come home to a place you've never called home? Find out as TCK's recount their personal experiences.

This is part two of a discussion on what it means to be a third culture kid. Check out part one here! I was 10 years old. I was in our apartment living room, sitting on our couch, surrounded by cardboard boxes. I felt sick to my stomach and scared to start over. I told my parents I wasn’t getting on the plane. I felt depressed because I knew I was just spewing nonsense. Of course I would have to get on the plane. I felt angry because my parents seemed so giddy and happy to be going home —…

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Third Culture Kids, Part 1: Overcoming Challenges On-Field

third culture kids
What is it like to grow up among multiple cultures? Read now to learn more about the challenges third culture kids experience on the mission field.

My 6-year-old self and my 4-year-old sister, Bianca stepped out of our front door, along with our mom, and into a dark, gray hallway. It smelled like rusted staircase railings and old wooden elevators. Sometimes the barely-big-enough-for-two-people elevator worked fine and sometimes it’d get jammed for a while. But we didn’t feel like walking down all the apartment stairs today, so we took our chances. The elevator creaked and rumbled, but made it to the bottom floor. “Taxi?” I asked Mom as we stepped out of the old, graffitied building and onto the city sidewalk. “The market is just around…

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