Tag - Zimbabwe

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7 Secrets to Being a Missionary in Your Golden Years
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Planting a Future for Zimbabwe’s Aged-Out Orphans
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INFOGRAPHIC: The Value of a Goat
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A Crazy Man, Fish and the God Who Provides
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Photo Journal: Zimbabwe
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Insights from the Field
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[VIDEO] Zimbabwe: Life-Giving Goats

7 Secrets to Being a Missionary in Your Golden Years

missionary age
How old is too old to be a missionary? Is there really an ideal missionary age? Hear from senior TEAM missionaries about their experiences. Photo by TEAM

Deb Prentice should not be a missionary. She should be doting on grandchildren. She should be finishing her career as a nurse practitioner. She’s just running away from the death of her husband. Well, that’s what people told her anyway. Deb originally thought she would go to the mission field in her 20s, as a newlywed. But then she and her husband had to care for her father-in-law. Then they started a family. Then they had grandkids. When God finally gave her the go-ahead in 2007, Deb was more than ready. But to be fair to her naysayers, moving to…

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Planting a Future for Zimbabwe’s Aged-Out Orphans

orphans in zimbabwe skills training
Many aged-out orphans in Zimbabwe face unemployment and a lack of skills to change their lives. But an agricultural training program is planting the seeds for a hopeful future. Photos courtesy of Steve and Anthea Love

“How can you go back and help the children of the very people who took your family’s livelihood?” a supporter asked TEAM missionary Anthea Love before she left for Zimbabwe. A missionary’s departure for the field doesn’t usually prompt questions about bitterness. But then, most missionaries aren’t returning to the nation where their family lost everything. Sixteen years ago, in an effort to right colonial-era wrongs, Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe introduced land reform that seized 4,000 white farmers’ land. Among those farmers were Anthea’s parents. With a mix of corruption and poor execution, the redistribution project led to the collapse…

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INFOGRAPHIC: The Value of a Goat

goat-gift-infographic
When you buy a goat for a family in need, you give the sustainable gift of nutrition and income.

In Zimbabwe, milking goats fill a critical need for children whose mothers have been lost to disease. Scroll through the infographic below to see how a goat gift is the gift that keeps on giving.     Visit TEAM’s Wish List to explore other tangible ways that you can invest in the work of TEAM missionaries around the world.

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A Crazy Man, Fish and the God Who Provides

fish for life
Dave and Cheryl Jereb provide food, skills training and the gospel message to their community through Fish for Life. Photo courtesy of Cheryl Jereb

History is full of missionaries who found success by blending in with the local culture. TEAM missionary Dave Jereb found it while building a reputation as a crazy, old, white guy. Dave and his wife, Cheryl, came to Zimbabwe with a vision to provide sustainable food sources and job training for needy communities through aquaponics, a self-contained system for growing produce and fish.   The fish live in tanks, and the nutrient-rich water is piped into plant beds where crops grow hydroponically. The plant roots cleanse the water, which is then pumped back into the fish tanks. Within a few months, fresh…

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Photo Journal: Zimbabwe

Two months ago, Kameron and Erin Toews boarded a plane in South Dakota and landed in Zimbabwe to serve at Karanda Missions Hospital. Check out their photo journal below as they give us a day-in-the-life glimpse of ministry and culture in southern Africa.

Makadii. Hello internet! We’re the Toews from South Dakota, USA, living at Karanda Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe for a year. Erin is serving as a nurse, and Kam is working as a videographer. We’ve been here two months now, and we’re are slowly getting into the swing of things. It’s amazing to be a part of God’s life changing work in beautiful Zim. We’re pumped to give you a small taste of life in the bush. So let’s go – hundai!

Makadii. Hello, Internet! We’re the Toews from South Dakota, USA, living at Karanda Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe for a year. Erin is serving as a nurse, and Kam is working as a videographer. We’ve been here two months now, and we are slowly getting into the swing of things. It’s amazing to be a part of God’s life-changing work in beautiful Zim. We’re pumped to give you a small taste of life in the bush. So let’s go – hundai!

 

Home sweet home! Here’s a typical Zimbabwean family home, with each building acting as a sort of “room” in the family’s house.

Home sweet home! Here’s a typical Zimbabwean family home, with each building acting as a sort of “room” in the family’s house.

 

Let us introduce you to sadza, the staple of the Zimbabwe diet. Sadza is corn meal mixed with water until it becomes the consistency of very thick mashed potatoes. Here it is served with a relish in peanut butter sauce, and seasoned chicken. I’m sure you were wondering: yes, of course you eat with your hands.

Let us introduce you to sadza, the staple of the Zimbabwe diet. Sadza is corn meal mixed with water until it becomes the consistency of very thick mashed potatoes. Here it is served with seasoned chicken and a relish in peanut butter sauce. I’m sure you were wondering: yes, of course you eat with your hands.

 

We’re serving at Karanda Mission Hospital this year, and almost every day we hear a local tell us how KMH is the best hospital in Zimbabwe. People travel across the entire country simply to receive quality, loving care. May God continue to be honored and made famous because of this hospital in the middle of the bush!

We’re serving at Karanda Mission Hospital this year, and almost every day we hear a local tell us how KMH is the best hospital in Zimbabwe. People travel across the entire country simply to receive quality, loving care. May God continue to be honored and made famous because of this hospital in the middle of the bush!

 

Nursing in Zimbabwe is so so so different than what I’m used to in America. Sure the culture and language is different, but even the names of medicines and basic procedures are different. I’m on the pediatrics ward this week, and I’m loving that I get to help the little munchkins. But some days can be frustrating and overwhelming since I have to re-learn so many nursing skills.

Nursing in Zimbabwe is so, so, so different from what I’m used to in America. Sure, the culture and language are different, but even the names of medicines and basic procedures are different. I’m on the pediatrics ward this week, and I’m loving that I get to help the little munchkins. But some days can be frustrating and overwhelming since I have to re-learn so many nursing skills.

 

“Mommy, this man took my picture with a big machine.” A smile is a beautiful thing.

“Mommy, this man took my picture with a big machine.” A smile is a beautiful thing.

 

Kids are something else! Even across the world in a culture so different than mine, kids are the same. You have the trouble makers, the pouters, the popular kids, the shy ones, and everything in between. Awana has been a great place for us to meet local kids and hear them shout Bible verses at the top of their little lungs.

Kids are something else! Even across the world, in a culture so different from mine, kids are the same. You have the trouble-makers, the pouters, the popular kids, the shy ones, and everything in between. Awana has been a great place for us to meet local kids and hear them shout Bible verses at the top of their little lungs.

 

Just a few years ago when Zimbabwe’s economy was at its lowest, $500,000,000 might be able to buy you a loaf of bread. Now, Zimbabwe has officially changed to the US Dollar, and the old notes are simply worth their value in paper. Today, we’re using US bills, and many of them are holding together by a thread.

Just a few years ago, when Zimbabwe’s economy was at its lowest, $500,000,000 might have been able to buy you a loaf of bread. Now, Zimbabwe has officially changed to the US Dollar, and the old notes are simply worth their value in paper. Today, we’re using US bills, and many of them are holding together by a thread.

 

Meet Douglas. Douglas walks the 7k path from his village to our house three days a week to tend our plants and yard for just a few hours of work a day. It can be difficult to find paying work in Zimbabwe, even for skilled and willing workers. He is such a joyous man and a hard worker. Many days Douglas has worked longer than asked because he can’t leave a job unfinished! When the economy gets better he plans to return to school to get a university degree in agriculture or teaching.

Meet Joshua. Joshua walks the 7k path from his village to our house three days a week to tend our plants and yard for just a few hours of work a day. It can be difficult to find paying work in Zimbabwe, even for skilled and willing workers. He is such a joyous man and a hard worker. Many days, Joshua has worked longer than asked because he can’t leave a job unfinished! When the economy gets better, he plans to return to school to get a university degree in agriculture or teaching.

 

Karanda Mission Hospital has an in-house radio studio that broadcasts music, devotionals, local news, and Bible readings to the wards. Each Friday morning, the nursing students fill the studio to sing and pray over the patients.

Karanda Mission Hospital has an in-house radio studio that broadcasts music, devotionals, local news and Bible readings to the wards. Each Friday morning, the nursing students fill the studio to sing and pray over the patients.

 

It’s jacaranda season! The purple trees remind us of a Dr. Seuss book. At the end of the day, the hospital court yard clears out only until the next morning where it’s again buzzing with patients, family members, and staff.

It’s jacaranda season! The purple trees remind us of a Dr. Seuss book. This tree sits in the hospital court yard, which buzzes daily with patients, family members and staff.

 

I see you through my binoculars. Meet Gary and Janet and their baby. Zimbabwe is known worldwide for its safaris and game parks. There’s no animal quite as amazing (aka awkward) as the giraffe. It’s our favorite and decorates much of our house.

I see you through my binoculars. Meet Gary and Janet and their baby. Zimbabwe is known worldwide for its safaris and game parks. There’s no animal quite as amazing (AKA awkward) as the giraffe. It’s our favorite and decorates much of our house.

 

Something as simple as driving needs to be relearned in Zimbabwe. Why? 1) 99% of vehicle are stick shift and we had never driven a manual before. 2) Drive on the left side of the road. 3) Traffic lights – aka “robots” - may or may not be working today. 4) DEFENSIVE DRIVING. People, cows, and public transit vans pop out of absolutely every crevice along the road.

Something as simple as driving needs to be relearned in Zimbabwe. Why? 1) 99% of vehicle are stick shift, and we had never driven a manual before. 2) Drive on the left side of the road. 3) Traffic lights – AKA “robots” – may or may not be working today. 4) DEFENSIVE DRIVING. People, cows and public transit vans pop out of absolutely every crevice along the road.

 

“Do not withhold good from those who deserve it, when it is in your power to act. Do not say to your neighbor, ‘Come back later; I’ll give it tomorrow’ – when you now have it with you.” Proverbs 3:27 & 28. This verse has become something of a theme verse for our little family. We do not always live by it, but regret it every time we forget its importance.

“Do not withhold good from those who deserve it, when it is in your power to act. Do not say to your neighbor, ‘Come back later; I’ll give it tomorrow’ – when you now have it with you” Proverbs 3:27-28. This verse has become something of a theme verse for our little family. We do not always live by it, but we regret it every time we forget its importance.

 

Want to connect with the Toews? Follow Kameron and Erin on Instagram or check out their blog.

PRAY

Pray that Erin will have confidence, patience and humbleness as she goes through orientation in a hospital setting very different than what she’s used to in America.

Pray that Kameron will have an eye to see stories that need to be told around Karanda.

Pray that God will teach the Toews to find their worth in Christ, not in completing a to-do list, and that they will find some good local friendships.

Praise God for the wonderful missionary relationships they’ve been able to build already.

GIVE

You can give directly to the Toews’s ministry in Zimbabwe by clicking here.

You can help TEAM send more missionaries like Kameron and Erin by supporting the Global Outreach (GO) Fund. Click here to give!

SERVE

Right now there are 47 different opportunities for you to serve in Zimbabwe. Missionaries are needed in the areas of education, medical care and business. Click here to learn more about TEAM’s ministries in Zimbabwe and view service opportunities.

Insights from the Field

Cheryl Jereb, Jocelyn’s mother, takes a moment to prepare her anatomy and physiology class for an exam, while the students nervously review their notes. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

David and Cheryl Jereb are TEAM missionaries at Karanda Mission Hospital in Zimbabwe. Their daughter, Jocelyn, recently spent some time with them in the field, and we have asked her to share with us about her time at Karanda. Hello all! This is Dave and Cheryl’s daughter, Jocelyn. As some of you may know I was blessed with an opportunity to spend the month of August with my parents seeing their life at Karanda Mission Hospital firsthand. I wanted to take some time to share what this is like from my perspective. First let me say that the country is absolutely beautiful…

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[VIDEO] Zimbabwe: Life-Giving Goats

Tawanda shows off his newest kid with pride. He was given a goat through the goat project a number of years ago and has now grown the number of goats he owns to four. Photo by Robert Johnson/TEAM

Over 1.4 million people living in Zimbabwe, fifteen percent of the population, have been diagnosed with AIDs1. By 2011, there were one million children living in Zimbabwe who had been orphaned as a result of parents dying from AIDs2. In a land plagued by disease, mothers are often unable to nurse due to health concerns. Many children are orphaned at a young age, left alone to find nourishment or die. Zimbabweans are facing the harsh realities of the AIDS epidemic, and countless children and orphans are suffering as a result. Karanda Mission Hospital, located in northern Zimbabwe, provides community healthcare,…

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